COMMUNICATION IN BRAIN SYSTEMS

 

This meeting was funded by The Swartz Foundation and The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

 

The Banbury Center, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, 16-19 May 2004

 

Organized By: Terry Sejnowski, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies

PROGRAM

 

Sunday, 16 May

 

Afternoon

 

Arrival at Robertson House, Banbury Center, for registration and room assignment

 

6:00 pm Reception at Robertson House

 

7:30 pm Dinner at Robertson House

 

Monday, 17 May

 

7:30-8:45 am

Breakfast at Robertson House

 

9:00-9:15 am

Jan A. Witkowski, Banbury Center, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold

Spring Harbor, New York: Introductory remarks.

 

Terry Sejnowski, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, San Diego,

California: Welcome and introductions.

 

9:15-12:15 pm

SESSION 1: Constraints on Communication

 

Chair: Terry Sejnowski, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, San

Diego, California

 

9:15-9:35 am

Dmitri Chklovskii, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York: Brain architecture maximizes neuronal connectivity while minimizing time delays.

 

9:35-9:45 am

Discussion

 

9:45-10:05 am

Eric Halgren, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown:

Intracolumnar vs Intercolumnar communication in the human neocortex.

 

10:05-10:15 am

Discussion

 

10:15:10:45 am

Break

 

10:45-11:05 am

Olivier Bertrand, INSERM, Lyon, France: Functional modulations of local and long-distance beta/gamma oscillatory synchronization: evidence from direct intracranial recordings in humans.

Presentation:

11:05-11:15 am

Discussion

 

11:15-11:35 am

Scott Makeig, University of California San Diego: Multiscale evidence of multiscale brain communication.

Presentation:

11:35-11:45 am

Discussion

 

11:45-12:15 pm

General discussion

 

12:30 pm

Luncheon at Robertson House

 

2:00-6:00 pm

SESSION 2: Regulation of Communication

Chair: Scott Makeig, University of California San Diego

 

2:00-2:20 pm

Pascal Fries, University of Nijmegen, The Netherlands: Neuronal coherence in man and monkey.

Presentation:

2:20-2:30 pm

Discussion

 

2:30-2:50 pm

Elizabeth Buffalo, NIMH, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland: Layer-specific attentional modulation of neuronal synchrony.

2:50-3:00 pm

Discussion

 

3:00-3:20 pm

Terry Sejnowski, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, San Diego, California:

Inhibitory mechanisms for attentional gain control.

 

3:20-3:30 pm

Discussion

 

3:30-4:00 pm

Break

 

4:00-4:20 pm

Gregor Rainer, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tubingen,

Germany: Phase locking of single neuron activity to theta oscillations during working memory in monkey extrastriate visual cortex.

 

Presentation:

4:20-4:30 pm

Discussion

 

4:30-4:50 pm

Michael Kahana, Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts:

From oscillations in the immature and mature human cortex.

Presentation:

 

4:50-5:00 pm

Discussion

 

5:00-5:20 pm

Kai K. Kaila, University of Helsinki, Finland: Infraslow oscillations in the immature and mature human cortex.

5:20-5:30 pm

Discussion

 

5:30-6:00 pm

General Discussion

 

6:15 pm

Reception at Robertson House

 

7:30 pm

Dinner at Robertson House

 

Tuesday, 18 May

 

7:30-8:45 am

Breakfast at Robertson House

 

9:00-12:30 pm

 

SESSION 3: Computation and Communication

Chair: John M. Allman, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena

 

9:00-9:20 am

 

9:20-9:30 am

Discussion

 

9:30-9:50 am

Emilio Salinas, Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina: Gain modulation as a mechanism for the selection of functional circuits.

9:50-10:00 am

Discussion

 

10:00-10:20 am

Rajesh Rao, University of Washington, Seattle: Probabilistic models of cortical computation and communication.

 

10:20-10:30 am

Discussion

 

10:30-11:00 am

Break

 

11:00-11:20 am

John H. Reynolds, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California:

Surface-based attention determines dominance in binocular rivalry.

 

11:20-11:30 am

Discussion

 

11:30-11:50 am

Xiao-Jing Wang, Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts: Cortical circuits of working memory and decision-making.

Presentation:

11:50-12:00 pm

Discussion

 

12:00-12:30 pm

General Discussion

 

12:45 pm

Luncheon at Robertson House

 

2:00-5:30 pm SESSION 4: Communication Infrastructure

Chair: Dmitri Chklovskii, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring

Harbor, New York

 

2:00-2:20 pm

Rahul Sarpeshkar, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge: Hybrid computation with spikes.

Presentation:

2:20-2:30 pm

Discussion

 

2:30-2:50 pm

Partha Mitra, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York: Metabolic cost of readiness.

 

2:50-3:00 pm

Discussion

 

3:00-3:30 pm

Break

 

3:30-4:00 pm

General discussion

 

4:00-4:20 pm

Giulio Tononi, University of Wisconsin-Madison:

Traveling waves and cortical connectivity.

 

4:20-4:30 pm

Discussion

 

4:30-4:50 pm

Rava da Silveira, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts:

Short paths and signal propagation in a Model Cortex.

 

4:50-5:00 pm

Discussion

 

5:00-5:20 pm

Dana Ballard, University of Rochester, New York:

Prospects for synchronous communication in the cortex.

 

5:20-5:30 pm

Discussion

 

6:00 pm

Reception at Robertson House

 

7:00 pm

Dinner at Robertson House

 

Wednesday, 19 May

 

7:30-8:45 am

Breakfast at Robertson House

 

9:00-12:00 pm SESSION 5: Command and Control of Communication

Chair: No chair for this session.

 

9:00-9:20 am

Robert T. Knight, University of California at Berkeley:

Prefrontal modulation of sensory processing.

     Presentation:

9:20-9:30 am

Discussion

 

9:30-9:50 am

Zachary F. Mainen, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor,

New York: Prefrontal and olfactory cortical circuits engaged during odor discrimination in the rat.

 

9:50-10:00 am

Discussion

 

10:00-10:30 am

Break

 

10:30-10:50 am

John M. Allman, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena: The fronto-insular cortex and the evolution of social cognition

 

10:50-11:00 am

Discussion

 

11:00-11:30 am

General Discussion.

 

12:00 pm

Luncheon at Robertson House

 

Afternoon departure


 


 

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